SIHH 2019: A. Lange & Söhne’s salmon-dial Datograph Perpetual Tourbillon

Three years on, the German maestro’s super-chronograph is swimming upstream with a pink-gold facelift to die for

A Lange & Sohne Datograph Perpetual Tourbillon with Salmon Dial
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At the time of writing, it was impossible to predict which of A. Lange & Söhne’s 2019 novelties would be rendered on a Brobdingnagian scale at the entrance to its SIHH stand. But given the drop-dead, devastating beauty of this particular masterclass in haute horlogerie, we’re holding out for a close encounter – and obligatory Insta’ selfie – with the new Datograph Perpetual Tourbillon, now in white gold with a pink-gold dial. It’d certainly make life easier for Lange, as all they’d need is to repaint the face of 2016’s monumental gate guard.

A Lange & Sohne Datograph Perpetual Tourbillon with Salmon Dial
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It’s a welcome dose of warmth from a brand whose aesthetic can occasionally feel cold, and immediately calls to mind the gorgeous ‘golden opaline’ dial of Patek Philippe’s ref. 5270P perpetual chronograph launched last year. Unexpectedly, the moonphase is really brought to life as well. Rather than feeling rather lost in the original’s night sky, here it seems to rise in a woozy harvest dusk.

What’s more, the new Datograph Perpetual Tourbillon also represents a bargainous €10,000 saving over the, ahem, €295,000 pricetag of the debut black-dial version in platinum.

A Lange & Sohne Datograph Perpetual Tourbillon with Salmon Dial
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If you can tear your eyes from the front-of-house theatrics, the real fireworks are to be witnessed through the display caseback, as is usual with Lange. Purists will immediately melt with respect and awe at the tourbillon, correctly kept behind the scenes and yet still tumbling within a sinuous carriage design that’s painstakingly hand-polished to a ‘black’ sheen.

A Lange & Sohne Datograph Perpetual Tourbillon with Salmon Dial
Courtesy

As well as a perpetual calendar and power reserve (subtly positioned in continuation of the tachymetre’s trajectory) you’re of course getting Lange’s legendary Datograph function into the mix. Which means, instead of a typical vertical-clutch pair-up, the dance of the column-wheel (left uncapped, unlike the Patek) is in concert with a dramatic horizontal gearshift. All adding up to what we consider to be one of the Glashütte uhrmacher’s finest-looking calibres. But that dial, though…

Limited to 100 pieces, €285,000, alange-soehne.com

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